Domain Search – Kicking Ass and Taking (Domain) Names

| February 27, 2014

domain searchOn behalf of the DomainTools team that worked super hard to get our third major release of 2014 out the door, I’m very pleased to announce the launch of our completely rebuilt Domain Search product.

Domain Search allows you to search through all domains currently registered in DNS that DomainTools knows about (which is pretty much all of them). This includes 100% of the gTLDs and most of the ccTLD domains worldwide. We also loop in historical search so users can surface all domains that used to be registered as well. This is a very powerful concept.

  • Want to see how much your brand is being used/abused in domain names worldwide? Use Domain Search.
  • Want to see if a given domain has ever been registered? Use Domain Search.
  • Want to see what TLDs are available for your new domain name? Use Domain Search.

There are over 250M domains currently in DNS. There are over 713M in our database of domains that have ever been registered. There are many ways to use this database to surface really interesting and relevant data. For more information, please see our Domain Search User Guide.

The first thing you will notice about the new Domain Search is the refined UX. It’s a challenge to represent over 100 TLDs in a search results interface, and that challenge will continue to grow as new gTLDs are added to the root. We’ve tried to experiment with some new ways to expose data across nTLDs and welcome your feedback on the current design.

Domain Search has been around for 8 years, but until now has only covered com, net, org, biz, info, and us. By extending the functionality to ccTLDs and all new gTLDs, we have significantly expanded its value. It’s a fair amount of work and ongoing resources to monitor all the domains coming into and out of DNS every day, and then to provision the systems that will allow real-time searching across all of those records. For this reason, Domain Search is now a Pro-membership-based product. If you are not currently a Pro member of DomainTools you can upgrade your membership or sign up for our Free Trial.

We told you early in 2014 that we were going to continue to provision our products with more data, more TLDs and an updated UX that better handles the increasing data being delivered in our search result sets. Our January release of Whois History was the first major product redesign of 2014, followed by IP Monitor and now Domain Search. And there’s more to come…

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Category: Domain Research, Domain Search, Domain Tools Updates, Domainers, gTLDs, New TLDs

About the Author ()

Tim Chen has been the CEO of DomainTools since its 2009 spin-out into an independent company. Tim has over 15 years experience as a sales and operations executive in internet-driven businesses, including 8 in the domain name and DNS space. Prior to this Tim spent seven years in business development executive roles with Internet and software companies in the Bay Area, and four years in the Corporate Finance group at J.P. Morgan in New York. Originally from Rochester, New York, Tim is a graduate of Haverford College and Stanford business school. When not in the office you can usually find Tim on his bike, on his surfboard (or falling off it), or sequestered away reading entirely too much about the Buffalo Bills' draft prospects.

Comments (3)

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  1. Mike says:

    This is good news! Thank you domaintools.com!

  2. Any chance we can still have access to the old version? The new version doesn’t seem to be as functional.

    e.g. a search for “school”, with the options of show taken domains only, show all domains using this search string, yields only only 110 results:

    http://www.domaintools.com/buy/domain-search/?query=school&registration=active_only&exclude=&position=all&input-min=&input-max=

    That’s just not correct. There are definitely a lot more domains that have “school” as a substring of the entire domain name. And when one clicks the “+” to expand it, the results are disorganized, and hard to grasp. The prior version, alphabetical and showing all matching domains in a table, was much easier to follow.

    I think if you poll power users who use DomainTools on a daily basis, the older version has features that are just not present in this new version.

    I don’t need to have access to all new gTLD results, that the new version provides. The older list of gTLDs (i.e. com/net/org/biz/info/us) was sufficient. I bet that is the case for many other users, too.

    Please provide access to those who prefer the old results and interface.

  3. Tim Helming says:

    Greetings, George

    Thanks for your feedback. I want to make sure we’re understanding you correctly.

    In your example, the 110 refers to taken domains across all TLDs (that we know about) for the exact string “school,” i.e. school.com, school.org, and 108 others.

    As for the multitudes of other domains that contain “school” as part of the string, you are definitely correct; that is what is shown in the subsequent rows in the table. Using your example, the second row of search results is “schools,” with 93 taken domains, then “myschool” with 77 taken domains, etc.

    As for the organization of the other TLDs, we will certainly take your comments into account as we look at ways to make the product even better.

    We appreciate your use of DomainTools and your product feedback.

    Kind regards,

    Tim Helming
    Director, Product Management
    DomainTools